Talk:OSGeo Vision for UN-GGIM

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The United Nations Programme on Global Geospatial Information Management (GGIM) is an inter-governmental mechanism to consult on issues related to global geospatial information.

On 26 October 2011, back to back with the first High Level Forum on GGIM, the UN Committee of Experts on Global Geospatial Information Management held its first formal session. The Committee decided that there is a need to document the thoughts of leaders in the geospatial world as to the future development of the geospatial world over the next 5 years and then looking further out, to thoughts as to its development over the next 10 years. The Committee is in particular interested how these developments will contribute to the local, national and global strategic agendas of economic growth, social cohesion and wellbeing, environmental sustainability, disaster management, public safety and good governance.

By the middle of 2012, a document will be produced which will be tabled at the next Committee’s meeting scheduled from 13th -15th August 2012. Following discussion at the Committee, a paper will be published.

As the co-chairs of the UN Committee, we are writing to seek your assistance in this endeavour, due to your important work in your particular aspect of the geospatial field. We are seeking inputs from data collection experts including those in remote sensing, image analysis, crowd sourcing, geodetics, National Mapping Agencies and surveying; as users we are seeking input from many including those involved in transport, open data, apps development, mobile and web usage, visualisation, decision support, infrastructure and disaster management. We also should like to understand future technology trends by inviting technology leaders to contribute including those involved in geospatial software, open source, database processing, sensor technology and general computing.

The work will be undertaken in two phases. We first wish you to write a short written contribution as part of asking experts from around the world as to their view on the emerging trends. The responses will be compiled and a meeting will then be organized at the UN in New York to discuss the findings.

As a recognised leader in geospatial information, we hope you would agree to participate in this process. We should be most grateful if you could contribute a short statement of 500-1000 words (no more please!) on how you see the future trends in your aspect of geospatial information management from your professional point of view over the next 5 years and then looking further out, to thoughts as to its development over the next 10 years.